BS 6798: 2014

BS 6798.2014 213x300 BS 6798: 2014

On 31st May 2014 a revised British Standard (BS) 6798: 2014 ‘Specification for selection, installation, inspection, commissioning, servicing and maintenance of gas-fired boilers of rated input not exceeding 70kW net‘ was introduced, replacing the previous 2009* standard.

*BS 6798: 2009 ‘Specification for installation and maintenance of gas-fired boilers of rated input not exceeding 70kW net’.

For many Gas Safe Registered engineers this revised British Standard will have an impact on their day-to-day work given that it applies to ‘domestic’ sized central heating boilers (those boilers <70 kW net).

Given the importance of this Standard to many of us in the gas industry, the following is a general overview of the revised BS 6798 and how it differs from its 2009 version.

Please note that not every point of the Standard is covered here and therefore, Gas Safe Registered engineers are advised to obtain a copy of BS 6798: 2014 from either BSi or for subscribers to Gas Safe’s technical library, Gas Safe Register.

BS 6798 – Forward
The general information on the preparation of the document; its date of introduction; information about the document, etc. is familiar and largely unchanged.

However, a new sub-heading of ‘Use of this document‘ is included which informs that the recommendations (presented in Commentary) form part of the specification and thus, to comply fully with the specification, all its provisions need to be complied with.

The list of regulations under ‘Compliance with a British Standard cannot confer immunity from legal obligations‘ has been extended and amended, to cover Scotland, Northern Ireland and Isle of Man in addition to England & Wales.

Scope
Text has had some minor amends to introduce standards related to the design of full heating systems; namely BS EN 12828, BS EN 12831 and BS EN 14336.

Other minor amends include the withdrawn status of BS 5449; competency covered by new Clause 4 (moved and amended from Annex A of the 2009 standard) and a new Note 7 covering LPG/air mixtures used in the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man.

2. Normative references and 3. Terms & Definitions
Minor amends to the list of references (standards updated) and definitions used.

4. Competence
Moved from 2009 Annex A and greatly expanded upon to cover Gas Safe Register; ACS; approval bodies and competency requirements by country/region.

5. Environmental conditions
A new clause covering the disposal/recycling of existing appliances and materials; optimisation of energy used and controlling harmful emissions.

6. Selection of equipment and pre-installation

6.1 Exchange of information and planning
Changes to text with ‘Consultation with official bodies‘ moved to appear first; reference to IGEM/UP/17 included in point f) to ‘Liaison between the various trades‘ and amended 2009 Note 2 (now a second bullet to f)), which discusses the requirements of Building Regulations with regards to inspection provisions for chimney systems in voids.

6.3 Condensing boilers

6.3.1 General – minor amends to Commentary.

6.3.2.1 General – text moved from 2009 Standard to appear sooner, plus new text a) to g) on general location considerations. Additionally, minor changes to Commentary.

6.3.3 Siting of chimney outlet – new Notes 1, 2 and 3; new point 5) on areas used for car parking and new point i) covering the limitation on roof installations and horizontal chimney terminations through tiled roofs for room-sealed, fan-assisted boilers.

6.3.4 Selection of condensate discharge point – an area of the Standard that see’s one of the biggest changes. The text has been amended and expanded upon from 2009 4.3.4 to give priority to internal discharge of condensate to combat freezing issues.

Additionally, previous Figures in 2009 Standard have been amended and moved to a new Annex A – discussed later in this update.

6.3.5 Combined discharge from pressure relief valve and boiler condensate drain – new text and Commentary covering the special conditions that apply for combined pressure relief discharge and condensate discharge pipe.

6.3.6 Use of condensate pump – amended text from 2009 4.3.3.3.

6.3.7 Choice of discharge pipe

6.3.7.1 Separate pressure relief valve and condensate discharge pipes – a new sub-heading.

6.3.7.1.1 Condensate removal – new text sign posting the requirements of 6.3.7.1.2 to 6.3.7.1.4.

6.3.7.1.2 Material – new Commentary on the jointing of condensate pipe.

6.3.7.1.3 Diameter of internally run condensate pipe – a new sub sub-heading. Amended 1st paragraph to introduce internal diameter (ID) of pipe instead of the previous use of outside diameter (OD); minimum 19mm (ID) instead of 22mm (OD). New Commentary to explain the switch to internal diameter.

6.3.7.1.4 Diameter of externally run condensate pipe – a new sub sub-heading. As for 6.3.7.1.3 an amended 1st paragraph to introduce the change to internal diameter for externally run pipe; from 32mm (OD) to 30mm (ID). New Commentary to explain the switch to internal diameter.

6.3.7.2 Combined pressure relief valve and condensate discharge pipes – a new sub-heading.

6.3.7.2.1 Discharge pipes combined outside the boiler during installation – a new sub sub-heading, text and Commentary covering the visibility of the combined discharge to the installer.

6.3.7.2.2 Removal by gravity – a new sub sub-heading and text covering 6 points – a) to f) – required to be met when combining a gravity discharge outside the boiler case.

6.3.7.2.3 Removal with condensate pump – a new sub sub-heading and text covering the 9 points – a) to i) – required to be met when using a condensate pump.

6.3.7.2.4 Discharge pipes combined internally within the boiler case – a new sub sub-heading.

6.3.7.2.4.1 Removal by gravity – a new sub sub-heading and text covering the combined discharge of pressure relief valve and condensate within the boiler via a single connection point at the boiler.

6.3.7.2.4.2 Removal with condensate pump – a new sub sub-heading, text and Commentary covering the requirements of using a condensate pump

6.3.8 Position and termination of the condensate drainage pipe
Minor amends to the text; a new point e) covering rainwater downpipes; new Note 3 covering the difference between foul and storm drains; new Note 5 explaining that there is no length restriction for condensate pipe when installed in accordance with the requirements of the Standard and new Note 6 stating that the condensate pump manufacturer needs to be consulted for any length restrictions.

6.3.9 In-line condensate neutralizer devices

6.3.9.1 In-line condensate neutralizer devices fitted to a dedicated condensate discharge pipe – a new sub head, repositioned text from 2009 4.3.5 and Note. Subtle change to text from prohibiting the use of neutralizers unless the manufacturer states otherwise to allowing their use unless the manufacturer states otherwise.

A new Commentary on point c) of 6.3.9.1 regarding servicing activities and the need to either replace the neutralizing medium annually or checking the acidity of condensate downstream of the device on a periodic basis, replacing the neutralizing medium as necessary.

6.3.9.2 In-line condensate neutralizer device fitted to a combined pressure relief valve and condensate discharge pipe

6.3.9.2.1 Discharge pipes combined outside the boiler during installation – new text covering the position of the connection of a combined pressure relief and condensate discharge to after the outlet of the neutralizer, unless the manufacturer allows a connection to its inlet.

6.3.9.2.2 Discharge pipes combined internally within the boiler – new text and Commentary covering the installation of a neutralizer to a single combined connection point at the boiler only where the manufacturer of the neutralizer allows.

6.4 Materials and components & 6.5 Boiler rating – minor text changes.

7 Installation

7.2 Chimney system – text added on concealed chimney systems in voids needing to comply with the requirements of Building Regulations and in Commentary, signposting for additional information for vertical condensing flexible flues in Gas Safe Register’s Technical Bulletin 139.

7.3 Siting of the appliance

7.3.1 General – new 1st paragraph covering the suitability of the floor, both in bearing the weight of the appliance when full of water and needing to be flat and level.

7.3.3 Airing cupboard installations

7.3.3.1 Airing cupboard installations where the space is to continue to be used as an airing cupboard – a new sub sub-heading.

7.3.3.2 Airing cupboard installations where the space is no longer to be used as an airing cupboard - a new sub sub-heading, text and Commentary covering the requirements of reusing an old airing cupboard and the need for appropriate labelling.

7.3.5 Bathroom and shower room installations – new paragraph – 7.3.5.3 – on electrical isolation for the appliance being protected by a 30mA RCD.

7.3.8 Roof space installation – new Commentary formed from 2009 point e) on providing a guard to prevent contact between stored articles and the boiler.

7.3.11 Ambient conditions – new clause covering the area in which the boiler is installed with regards to it being clean, dry and ensuring good ventilation to limit the ambient temperature to minimum and maximum levels stated by the appliance manufacturer.

7.4.3 Pressure relief valve – point a) amended and expanded upon to allow other materials that are not metallic to be used where this material is acceptable to either the boiler or pipe manufacturer (2009 5.4.3.2 a) stipulated metallic only).

Additionally, a new point b) regarding pressure relief for sealed system boilers installed below ground-level (basements) has been made from text within 2009 standard.

7.4.4.2 clause has a minor amend to remove a sentence that discussed minimum thickness of insulation in accordance with BS 5422, Annex H.

7.6.3 a) Single point of electrical insulation – a new sub-heading

In addition, a new clause b) Two (or more) separate and independent points of isolation has been included with text and Commentary discussing multiple points of isolation and its various requirements.

7.7.2 Open systems

7.7.2.1 Feed and expansion cistern – minor amends to text with reference to the UK National Annex to BS EN 14336; internal diameter of warning/overflow pipe stated at 19mm and Commentary expanded to discuss minimum dimensions of support beyond the cistern that it supports (150mm on all sides).

7.7.2.2 Hot water storage vessel & 7.7.3.1 Filling and make-up equipment – a minor amend with mention of UK National Annex to BS EN 14336 inserted once again.

7.7.3.4 Methods of filling sealed system – a minor amend to reference schedule 2, Section 8, paragraph 24 of the WRAS Water Regulations Guide.

7.8 Selection of heating system controls
New heading, text and Commentary relating to installing controls specified by the appliance manufacturer.

8 Post-installation

8.1 Inspection – text amended to create a new point a) which discusses the work undertaken is in accordance with the Standard, manufacturer’s instructions, and GSIUR; a new b) concerned with the legal requirement in some parts of the UK to have CO alarms installed which must be complied with; and 2009 Commentary and Recommendations altered to form a new Note 1 with bullets that includes additional detail on multiple points of electrical isolation.

8.2.1 Final filling of the system – 8.2.1.3 see’s minor amends in relation to softened water and the need to add corrosion inhibitor specifically formulated for this type of system, in a dosage recommended by the manufacturer.

8.2.2 Boiler

8.2.2.1 – new Commentary added regarding the compulsory measurement of CO during commissioning process of a new boiler and the additional guidance contained within a Gas Safe Register Technical Bulletin 143.

8.2.2.2 – minor amend to text to “heat input is measure and, where necessary, correctly adjust…” (2009 Standard stated “input is correctly adjusted in accordance…”).

8.2.2.4 & 8.2.2.5 Commentary – minor amends.

8.3 Advice to user of the appliance

8.3.1 User instructions – a new Note inserted on the requirement of the GSIUR for instructions to be left on site with the user.

8.3.1.2 Commentary – text added on the legal requirement for parts of the UK to have CO detector alarms installed.

8.3.1.3 – new text and Commentary inserted on multiple points of electrical isolation and the correct labelling of such systems.

8.3.3 Maintenance – a new paragraph inserted to Commentary advising that older CO detector alarms (those manufactured to BS 7860) installed on existing installations should be replaced for a CO detector alarm that complies with the latest requirements of BS EN 50291.

8.4 Service & maintenance
1st paragraph amended to be a new Note 1 on the need to use competent persons (Gas Safe Registered engineers) for servicing/maintenance procedures.

Note 2 amended with regards to demonstrating competence in the use of combustion gas analysers.

Annex A (normative) Connection options for condensate and combined pressure relief valve/condensate discharge
Text and Figures moved from body of document in 2009 Standard to form a new Annex A.

A.2 Connection to an external foul water discharge point – new text formed from industry guidance published by the Heating and Hotwater Industry Council (HHIC) on preventing condensate arrangements from freezing.

Figures A.2 a) & b) amended to reflect the requirement for increased pipe diameter for pipe passing to external atmosphere, inclusion of insulation material, point of termination cut at a 45° angle, etc.

A2.3 Connection to an external soil and vent stack system – text largely unchanged (slight amends), but moved to appear after Figure A.2 b).

A2.4 Connection to an external drain, gully or rainwater hopper (Figure A.4)2009 Note 1 & 2 deleted; Note 1 was a cross reference and Note 2 discussed pipe entry on rainwater downpipes.

New Figure A.3 Connection to condensate drainage pipe to external soil and vent stack.

Amended Figure A.4 (2009, Figure 3) External drain, gully or rainwater hopper – increased pipe diameter for pipe passing to external atmosphere, inclusion of insulation material, point of termination cut at a 45° angle, etc.

A2.5 Special conditions when using a rainwater downpipe (Figure A.5) – new text and Figure A.5 on the requirements of using this condensate termination arrangement.

A2.6 Connection to a purpose-made soakaway (Figure A.6) – amended Figure A.6 to reflect the requirement for increased pipe diameter for pipe passing to external atmosphere, inclusion of insulation material, point of termination cut at a 45° angle, etc.

As can be seen, the Standard has undergone significant review/amends with the greatest amends relating to condensate discharge/disposal. Read as a whole, the revised BS 6798: 2014 introduces advancements in safety and satisfactory operation of installed condensing boilers, and as such can only be welcomed as an improvement over the withdrawn 2009 Standard.

Ensure your up to speed on the latest requirements of BS 6798: 2014.

Words by Chris Long

Industry Updates – W/C 5th May 2014

We have some updates for you this week – starting with a revised Technical Bulletin from Gas Safe Register, followed by some news relating to public consultations of three Microgeneration Certification Scheme documents and finally finishing with energy efficiency information and performance data released by the Department for Communities and Local Government.

Gas Safe Register Technical Bulletin

GS RegLogo 1a 150x150 Industry Updates – W/C 5th May 2014Gas Safe has reviewed and issued a revised Technical Bulletin (TB) 022 ‘Installation of previously used and second-hand domestic gas cooking appliances‘ – the TB is issued 1st May 2014 and replaces the previous version, issued December 2010 which is withdrawn.

The TB focuses on ‘previously used’ and ‘second-hand’ gas cooking appliances (there is a distinction drawn between the terms) in accordance with British Standard (BS) 6172: 2010 ‘Specification for installation, servicing and maintenance of domestic gas cooking appliances (2nd and 3rd family gases)‘.

The TB includes an additional illustration (Figure 3) to further clarify the minimum combustion clearance requirements for cooking appliances. A ‘Decision process flow chart’ is provided via an Appendix, which will guide registered engineers in applying the requirements for either ‘previously used’ or ‘second-hand’ gas cooking appliances.

Registered engineers are encouraged to log in to their online account and to access the TB via the Technical Portal of the website – https://engineers.gassaferegister.co.uk

Microgeneration Certification Scheme Consultation

MIS Combined 150x150 Industry Updates – W/C 5th May 2014The Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) has recently released three documents for public consultation:

  • MIS 3005 Requirements for contractors undertaking the supply, design, installation, set to work, commissioning and handover of microgeneration heat pump systems.
  • MCS 007 Product certification scheme requirements: Heat pumps; and
  • MCS 001 Installer certification scheme requirements.

The proposed changes to MIS 3005 are colour coded, with:

  • Hot Water Heat Pumps (HWHP) – changes shown in dark green
  • Very High Temperature Heat Pumps (VHTHP) – changes shown in red; and
  • Solar Assisted Heat Pumps (SAHP) – changes shown in dark blue.

The public consultations can be viewed/downloaded from the MCS website, along with explanatory text and the appropriate response forms (the forms must be used for any responses. Any responses received other than on the appropriate response form will not be accepted).

MIS 3005 & MCS 007 have a closing date of 18th May 2014, and MIS 001 has a closing date of 30th May 2014.

Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates

EPB Certificates 150x150 Industry Updates – W/C 5th May 2014The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG) has published on 30th April 2014 various documents relating to energy performance of domestic and non-domestic buildings in England and Wales that have been constructed, sold or let since 2008.

It is important to stress that the information is presented as an experimental statistics and is subject to evaluation and testing – indeed, the DCLG is actively seeking the input of interested parties in further developing this data and how its should be used.

A short survey is provided for this purpose, which can be accessed at https://surveymonkey.com/s/GKWSVGF

The data is presented in the following documents:

  • Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates: Q1 2008 to Q4 2013, England and Wales
  • Table A1: Energy Performance Certificates for all properties by total floor area and type of property
  • Table D1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by energy efficiency rating
  • Table D2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by environmental impact rating
  • Table D3: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by floor area, size, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs
  • Table D7: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings by type of property, and average energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs
  • Table LA1: domestic Energy performance Certificates for all dwellings in each local authority, by energy efficiency rating
  • Table LA2: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for all dwellings in each local authority, by environmental impact rating
  • Table NB1: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by energy efficiency rating
  • Table NB2: domestic Energy Performance certificates for new dwellings by environmental impact rating
  • Table NB3: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by floor area, size, energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs
  • Table NB4: domestic Energy Performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property
  • Table NB7: domestic Energy performance Certificates for new dwellings by type of property, average energy use, carbon dioxide emissions and fuel costs
  • Table A: non-domestic Energy Performance Certificates by energy performance asset rating
  • Table DEC1: Display Energy Certificates by local authority and energy performance operational rating; and
  • Table DEC2: Display Energy certificates – annual energy use and carbon dioxide emissions

Visit the DCLG website should you wish to view/download the information – the majority of the data is presented in excel format.

Words by Chris Long

Industry Update – W/C 14th April 2014

Gas Safe Register – Industry Standard Update

GS RegLogo 1a Industry Update – W/C 14th April 2014Industry Standard Update (ISU) 046 ‘IGEM/IG/1 – Standards of Training in Gas Work‘ is issued on 9th April 2014 and deals with the recent publication of the Institution of Gas Engineers and Managers (IGEM) and Energy & Utility Skills (EUSkills) IGEM/IG/1.

This latest industry standard, jointly developed by IGEM and EUSkills, after consultation with industry (including Gas Safe Register and the Health & Safety Executive) was published on 1st April 2014 entitled –

IGEM/IG/1 ‘Standards of training in gas work. Criteria and guidance in the development and delivery of training programmes in gas work.’ Communication 1767.

IGEMIG1 738x1024 Industry Update – W/C 14th April 2014IGEM/IG/1 replaces the previous HSE COP 20 ‘Standards of Training in Safe Gas Installation – Approved Code of Practice‘, which is now withdrawn.

IGEM/IG/1 provides criteria and guidance to the industry and training providers, trainee engineers and employers on the scope, standards and quality of training required to enable a gas engineer to achieve competence.

The intention is that from the 1st January 2015, all organisations that provide training to new entrants in the gas industry will be required to follow the guidance and meet the criteria contained within IGEM/IG/1.

The guidance on the scope of training and the need for assessment/reassessment of gas engineers (formerly in COP 20) is now contained within Part B of the revised HSE Approve Code of Practice (ACoP) – Series Code: L56 ‘Safety in the installation and use of gas systems and appliances‘, published in 2013.

IGEM/IG/1 can be freely accessed online via IGEM’s free standards page and by clicking on the appropriate document to download a pdf copy (other free Standards will also be found on this holding page), or alternatively, a hard copy can be purchased from IGEM’s shop for £20.

More details on IGEM/IG/1 can be found in ISU 046, available from the engineers portal of Gas Safe website – https://engineers.gassaferegister.co.uk

Words by Chris Long

Revised Safety Alert from Gas Safe Register

GS RegLogo 1a Revised Safety Alert from Gas Safe RegisterIn June 2013, Gas Safe Register produced with SIME Boilers a Safety Alert (SA) relating to specific models of their “Format C” boilers; models 80C, 100C and 110C  –

Safety Alert 011 ‘Sime Boilers – Potential printed circuit board failure, causing overheating of ‘Format C’ gas boilers’.

This SA has been revised by SIME Boilers following some nuisance tripping issues with the originally recommended thermostat location.

Safety Alert 011 ‘Sime Boilers – Potential printed circuit board failure, causing overheating of ‘Format C’ gas boilers (Revised) has therefore been issued on 9th April 2014, with the original 2013 alert being withdrawn.

Registered engineers may encounter this model, which has already been modified in accordance with the original SA 011 (thermostat will be located on the right hand side of the appliance, on the first coil of the heat exchanger in this case), or those that have not been modified so far.

The modification kit (comprising of a manual reset overheat thermostat, securing spring and electrical connection) is free to registered engineers by contacting SIME Boilers on Tel: 0845 901 1114.

Registered engineers are recommended therefore to obtain a copy of the revised SA 011, which includes guidance on locating the thermostat and its associated electrical wiring, by accessing the technical portal of Gas Safe Register’s website – https://engineers.gassaferegister.co.uk

Words by Chris Long

Industry Updates – W/C 7th April 2014

Having a say features this week, with a couple of public consultations being released by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS).

Additionally, MCS launches a new process for those customers needing a Certificate for their MCS installation, where one hasn’t been provided – well for those that meet the qualifying criteria that is.

Public Consultations

There are two ‘public consultations’ to discuss this week; one from the HSE on three Approved Codes of Practice (ACoP’s) and one from the MCS on MCS Standard – MCS 001.

Starting with the HSE -

The HSE continues with its programme of public consultations on various ACoPs in response to Professor Löfstedt independent review of health and safety legislation – the latest being CD268.

CD2681 771x1024 Industry Updates – W/C 7th April 2014CD268 consults on:

The consultation began on 31st March and will close on 23rd May 2014 and follows a previous public consultation that closed in September 2012.

The consultation applies to the ACoPs only and not the legislation on which the ACoPs are based – no change to legislation is proposed currently. The review aims to remove time-limited material from the ACoPs and where appropriate, to simplify the text within.

Anyone with an interest can download the consultation document, which includes the suggested revisions to the three ACoPs as well as the ‘response’ form should interested parties want to make a comment.

MCS –

Consultation on MCS 001 2014 Summary Final 1 748x1024 Industry Updates – W/C 7th April 2014The working group to MCS 001 ‘Installer Certification Scheme Requirements’ have made some amends to MCS 001 and have invited members of the public to comment.

The consultation provides the following information –

“The changes are predominantly centred around the following sections:

Appendix A, Clause 8:

  • The section in bold has been amended to clarify that the MCS installer that enters into a contract for the sale and installation of a system with a customer, must be the same company that creates the MCS certificate on their own MCS account.
  • A sentence was added to clarify that a contract for the sale and installation of a system must not be in the name of more than one company. This will the prevent joint contracts from being compliant.”

Anyone wishing to make comment must do so by 30th May 2014, using the comments form that can be downloaded from the MCS website; the summary of the changes and the MCS standard can also be downloaded, as required.

MCS Certificates

Combined checklistdisclaimer 1024x982 Industry Updates – W/C 7th April 2014Staying with MCS – a process has been launched for customers to obtain MCS certificates where the MCS installation company has ceased trading or are no longer MCS certified.

The process is designed to assist customers who may be missing their MCS Certificate or did not receive a copy of the Certificate from the original MCS installation company.

There are however, strict qualifying criteria for replacement certificates, them being:

  • Commissioned by an MCS company;
  • Includes an MCS certified product; and
  • Have commissioning date on or after 15th July 2009.

A link is provided on the MCS website for customers to be able to download a copy of the process and a copy of the MCS certificate, including a Disclaimer which will accompany the Certificate.

Additionally, customers will also need to download, sign and return a customer statement – again a link is provided.

TrustMark

Lastly, the government back scheme for reputable tradesman, TrustMark, is re-launched this week – part of the government’s construction strategy “Construction 2025″.

The re-launched scheme see’s a tightening of the scheme criteria for those tradesman wishing to join, including those who are already members, which focuses on improved customer service, good trading practices and of course, technical competence.

For existing members, a time frame of 12 months has been set for them to adapt to the new core criteria.

For further guidance on all things related to TrustMark, visit www.trustmark.org.uk

Words by Chris Long

Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014

Gas Safe Register’s TB 112

GS RegLogo 1a 150x150 Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014Gas Safe Register has reviewed and issued a revised TB 112 ‘Obtaining meter index readings for gas rating on electronic and SMART gas meters’, which replaces the previous version published in December 2011.

The TB, published 28 March 2014, details the procedure to use when conducting a gas rating check on gas appliances where the latest electronic/SMART meters are installed.

These new breed of meters have a display that powers down after a very short period if not physically interacted with (prolonging battery and LCD life), making reading the gas meter index for gas consumption (gas rating) less intuitive for gas engineers.

Two meter manufacturer’s covered by the TB are Landis+Gyr and Secure Meters (UK) (formerly PRI) – more may be added at a later date as other manufacturers enter the UK market – both of these meters will require the display to be ‘awoken’ by depressing either button ‘A’ (Landis+Gyr) or ’9′ on a numeric keypad (Secure Meters (UK)) in order to read the display.

The TB contains a process for each manufacturer’s meter display and can be accessed by registered gas engineers/businesses by login into their online account and accessing the technical area of the website – https://engineers.gassaferegister.co.uk

HSE Guidance

l144 746x1024 Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014Firstly, the HSE has of today (31 March 2014), opened a ten-week consultation of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 2007 (CDMR); the consultation closes on 6 June 2014.

The aim of the consultation is to deliver a simpler set of regulations (easier to understand and therefore, comply with), whilst retaining safety protection.

The changes being proposed are:

  • replacement of the CDMR co-ordinator role with a principle designer role within a project team
  • introducing a duty on information, instruction, training and supervision to replace the duty to assess competence
  • removal of the domestic client exemption and transfer of these limited duties to the contractor/designer; and
  • replacement of the Approved Codes of Practice (ACoP) with tailored guidance.

These are only proposals currently and as such, not set in stone. The HSE want to hear from anyone who is/will be affected by a revised CDMR, so make sure you have your say.

GS50

gs503rd Edition 737x1024 Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014The HSE has revised GS50 ‘Electrical safety at places of entertainment’, with this third edition being published 2014.

The guide is aimed at managers of places of entertainment and others who provide facilities for entertainers, and will also be useful to technicians and technical managers.

GS50 provides general advice on managing electrical safety and ways to prevent electrical danger. Comprised of three parts, paragraphs 4 – 12 look at the risks and the legal duties, 13 – 19 provides general advice on managing electrical safety and 20 – 58 provide specific advice on ways to prevent electrical danger.

HSG195

hsg195 746x1024 Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014Additionally and in keeping with the theme of entertainment, the HSE also produce guidance for those who organise music events – HSG 195 ‘The event safety guide (Second Edition)‘, which will guide the reader on running a safe event; this also focus on the needs of others concerned with the event (local authority and emergency services), so they can all work together.

MCS – Permitted development rights for wind turbines and air source heat pumps on domestic properties

The Department for Communities and Local Government (DCLG), in partnership with the Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) and Department for Food and Rural Affairs (DFRA) have conducted a one year review of the permitted development rights for wind turbines and air source heat pumps, which was introduced in December 2011.

The development rights included a requirement to comply with the Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) Planning Standards, which specifies a noise level of 42 decibels for wind turbines and air source heat pumps installed on domestic properties.

The outcome of the review can be downloaded from the MCS website, but in summary there is no case at this time to amend the 42 decibel noise level required under MCS Planning Standards; this will be reviewed again in the near future.

Ofgem – Domestic Renewable heat Incentive (RHI) Factsheet

es826rhidomesticfactsheet001 1 706x1024 Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014Ofgem has published (February 2014) a Factsheet on the soon to be introduced Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI), which is due to be launched in the spring.

The factsheet provides basic information to applicants wanting to apply for the RHI, in advance of more detailed information being prepared.

The Factsheet looks:

  • what it is
  • two schemes – domestic and non-domestic
  • requirement for Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) and what it is
  • which is the right one for you, etc.

Other factsheets are also available on:

  • An introduction to the Domestic Renewable heat Incentivepregolivees832rhidomesticfactsheet002 1 1024x888 Industry Updates – W/C 31 March 2014
  • Already installed before Domestic RHI opening?
  • Do i need metering for the Domestic RHI?
  • A metering and monitoring service package for the Domestic RHI

Note: The above Factsheets can be accessed from the Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) Factsheet, via the included links.

Further detailed guidance will also be released once the scheme is launched.

Plumbing & Heating Contractors Alliance

And finally, a National legionella scheme has been launched by the Plumbing & Heating Contractors Alliance; a strategic alliance between the Association of Plumbing & Heating Contractors (APHC) and the Scottish and Northern Ireland Plumbing Employers’ Federation (SNIPEF).

The scheme aims to ensure that reputable plumbing companies who understand the risk assessment process and who can carry out the remedial action, where identified, are used by property owners (commercial or public use) who have a legally responsibility to manage risks from legionella.

For Scotland and Northern Ireland, further information can be found at www.legionellacheck.org

For England and Wales, further information can be found at www.aphc.co.uk/legionella-inspection-scheme.asp

Words by Chris Long

Industry Update – W/C 24th March 2014

There have been some recent amendments to legislation for England, Wales and Northern Ireland. However, these amendments will have little to no impact on tradesman, but are presented here in this Industry Update with the sole intention of keeping readers informed.

As well as legislation, Northern Ireland’s DOE has also updated their information leaflet No.12, which is aimed at householders and discusses the general exclusion of planning permission for certain small scale renewable installations.

Legislation

The UK (England, Wales, Scotland & Northern Ireland) –

  • The Energy Act 2013

England –

  • The Building Regulations &c. (Amendment) Regulations 2014

Wales –

  • The Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2014

Northern Ireland –

  • The Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2014

The Energy Act 2013

Energy Act 2013 734x1024 Industry Update – W/C 24th March 2014The Act, which received Royal Assent (formal approval by the monarch) on 18 December 2013, provides a framework for delivering secure, affordable and low carbon energy.

The purpose of the Act is to ensure that, as older power plants are taken offline, the UK remains able to generate enough energy to meet its needs even if demand increases.

The Act therefore, looks to ensure the ongoing security of UK supplies, whilst decarbonising the energy network, all of which requires significant investment in an energy mix that will deliver the UK’s energy needs for many decades to come.

The Act is presented in seven parts:

  • Part 1 deals with decarbonisation.
  • Part 2 deals with electricity market reform.
  • Part 3 deals with nuclear regulation and the power/responsibilities of the ONR (Office of Nuclear Regulation).
  • Part 4 deals with government pipeline and storage systems; a system of pipe lines (some 2,500 kilometres of varying diameters), storage facilities, pumping stations, etc. of light oil petroleum products.
  • Part 5 deals with strategy and policy statement.
  • Part 6 deals with consumer protection and miscellaneous issues
  • Part 7 deals with provision authorising spending in relation to electricity market reform.

The sum of Act applies to England, and parts thereof to Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, as applicable.

The Building Regulations &c. (Amendment) Regulations 2014

Building Regs 2014 728x1024 Industry Update – W/C 24th March 2014The amendment to the Building Regulations &c. (S.I. 2014/579) were made on 10 March 2014 and come in to full force on the 6 April 2014; they apply to England and to excepted energy buildings in Wales.

The amendment introduces changes to the Building Regulations 2010 (S.I. 2010 No. 2214) and the Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010 (S.I. 2010 No. 2215), and announces the authorisation of third party certification schemes for electrical work in dwellings.

Third party certification for electrical installations has been introduced by Regulations 2(3), 2(6) and 2(10):

  • 2(3) amends regulation 12 of The Building Regulations 2010, removing the requirement to give the local building authority a notice or deposit of full plans where a third party certifier has been appointed before work commences.
  • 2(6) introduces a new regulation 20A to The Building Regulations 2010, allowing the local authority to accept a certificate from the third party certifier as evidence that regulations 4 & 7 of the Building Regulations have been satisfied in respect of the work certified. It also requires the third party certifier to issue a certificate where they are satisfied that the work complies, or where they are not satisfied, to inform the local authority.
  • 2(10) inserts a new Schedule 3A into the Building Regulations 2010, listing authorised bodies who run a third party certification scheme for electrical work in dwellings.

The Amendment, via regulation 2(9), also replaces Schedule 3 (which is revised and consolidated) of The Building Regulations 2010.

Other minor and consequential amendments are made to both The Building Regulations 2010 & The Building (Approved Inspectors etc.) Regulations 2010.

The Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2014

Wales 728x1024 Industry Update – W/C 24th March 2014The amendment to the Welsh regulations was made 20 February 2014 and came into force 14 March 2014 (S.I 2014 No. 375 (W.43)). They contribute toward the implementation of Article 30 of Directive 2012/19/EU – the ‘Seveso III Directive‘.

Article 30 classifies heavy fuel oils (HFOs) as ‘Petroleum products’ rather than the previous classification of ‘Dangerous for the Environment’ (DFE).

By re-classifying HFOs, the bottom and top tiers of 100 and 200 tonnes, respectively, have been increased to 2, 500 and 25,000 tonnes and thereby increasing the qualifying threshold inventories before the requirements of regulations become applicable.

Regulation 2 of the 2014 regulations, amends the 1992 regulations by adding HFOs to the list of named substances in Part A of Schedule 1 to the 1992 regulations.

The Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2014

Northern ireland 733x1024 Industry Update – W/C 24th March 2014In the same vein as for Wales ‘Planning (Hazardous Substances) (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2014′, the amendment to The Control of Major Accident Hazards (Amendment) Regulations (Northern Ireland) 2014, introduces HFOs to the named substances of Article 30 and 31 of Council Directive 2012/18/EU.

This Amendment comes in to effect 7 April 2014.

Other guidance

Northern Ireland – Information leaflet No.12

Produced by the Department of the Environment (DOE) for Northern Ireland, Information Leaflet No.12 ‘Renewable Energy Development within the Curtilage of a Dwelling House – Permitted Development Rights’ has been revised as of March 2014.information leaflet 121 1 728x1024 Industry Update – W/C 24th March 2014

The purpose of Information Leaflet No.12 is to provide guidance to householders on the extent to which small scale renewable energy development are ‘permitted development’ under Schedule 1 to the Planning (General Development) Order (Northern Ireland) 1993 and as such, do not require planning permission; subject to certain exceptions within legislation (listed buildings for example).

Words by Chris Long

MCS 012 Letter – March 2014

The Microgeneration Certification Scheme (MCS) has published an open letter on their website regarding MCS 012 ‘Product Certification Scheme Requirements: Pitched Roof Installation Kits’.

In particular, the open letter explains the decision to delay the mandatory implementation date for using certified products by installers till 30th June 2014.

A copy of the letter can be seen below -

20140314MCS012Letter 728x1024 MCS 012 Letter   March 2014

Visit the MCS website to download a copy of the letter.

Words by Chris Long

Industry Update – W/C 17 February 2014

We have a couple of updates today; a revised Technical Bulletin from Gas Safe register dealing with flood damage to gas systems/appliance (very topical given the current weather) and revised guidance from the Health and Safety Executive aimed at all businesses in controlling risks at work.

Gas Safe Register – Technical Bulletin 114

TB 114 ‘Responding to a request to attend flood damaged gas appliances and pipework’ has been reviewed and amended where necessary, replacing the September 2010 version.

The TB provides commonsense advice to gas businesses/installers on what to look for and do when contacted by customers to attend to gas appliances that have been exposed to and/or damaged by flood water.

The advice looks at:

  • Personal health & safety – basic forms of protection (gloves, overalls, masks, etc) given the likelihood of hazardous bacteria being present within properties which has been carried in by the water, as well as more immediate threats to life from potentially live electrical supplies and the like;
  • Isolation of gas supply – making the installation safe via the ECV, which may also include the assistance of the gas supplier should water have entered or otherwise damaged the gas meter/gas service (similarly for LPG installations, the gas supplier may need to be involved where assessing bulk storage vessels and cylinder installations);
  • Gas pipework – checking and possibly clearing water from flooded pipework, which may entail replacement (full or partial) to effect a repair;
  • Gas appliances – disconnection and possible strip down so an assessment can be made as to the damage caused, which may mean new parts if economical to repair or a replacement appliance; and
  • Ventilation provisions – checking suitability and possibly removing obstacles that may have been deliberately placed by worried customers or emergency services in an attempt to hold back floodwater.

This and other technical guidance can be accessed from the engineers portal of gas safe’s website – https://engineers.gassaferegister.co.uk

Health and Safety Executive – Leaflets/guidance

The HSE has reviewed and where required, revised their Health & Safety Guidance (HSG) 268 ‘The health and safety toolbox. How to control risks at work‘.

hsg268 753x1024 Industry Update – W/C 17 February 2014This simple guide is aimed at those starting up a small business, or those who have responsibilities as the safety representative for larger organisations, and who want advice on how to control workplace hazards.

HSG268 includes:

  • Case studies showing how accidents and cases of ill health have occurred, with helpful tips on how to avoid similar things happening in the future.
  • Simplified advice on key duties, making it easier to comply with the law and run your business.
  • List of Do’s and Don’ts for key hazards.
  • Updates on legal changes.

Note: The HSE has a comprehensive website that also offers videos and audio resources, such as talking leaflets on all manner of subjects to make getting hold of the information and consuming its contents quick and painless as possible.

Words by Chris Long

Industry Update – W/C 10th February 2014

We have a mixed bag of updates today, starting with amendments to the Welsh Building Regulations, an update to the Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC) standard for combined heat and power (CHPQA) and updated guidance from the HSE on working on or near underground services, working at height and the use of ladders – discussed in last weeks updates to the HSE’s web portal for Working at height.

Building Regulations – Wales

The Building Amendment Wales Regulations 2014 1 747x1024 Industry Update – W/C 10th February 2014The Building (Amendment) (Wales) Regulations 2014 were made on 21 January 2014 and come in to effect 31 July 2014.

This amendment introduces new, as well as extending existing provisions relating to energy efficiency of buildings regulated for under the 2010 Building Regulations.

The amendment introduces:

  • A supplement to Regulation 21(4) of the 2010 Regulations to extend the energy efficiency requirements to a conservatory or porch to which a fixed heating appliances has been provided to heat that conservatory/porch.
  • Regulation 5, enabling Welsh ministers to approve target primary energy consumption rates for new buildings (other than new dwellings) and target fabric performance values for new dwellings.
  • Regulation 6 inserts regulations 26A and 26B to the 2010 Regulations requiring new buildings (other than new dwellings) not to exceed the target primary energy consumption rate and for new dwellings, the target fabric performance values mentioned in Regulation 5 above.
  • Regulation 7 inserts regulations 27A and 27B to the 2010 Regulations, setting out the procedure to follow when submitting evidence of the target primary energy consumption rate and the target fabric performance values to the local authority.
  • Regulation 8 substitutes regulation 28 of the 2010 Regulations to supplement and extend certain requirements to buildings with a total useful floor area under 1000m2.

Department of Energy & Climate Change (DECC)

CHPQA.Nov 2013.Issue 5 693x1024 Industry Update – W/C 10th February 2014DECC has introduced issue 5 of the CHPQA (Combined Heat and Power Quality Assurance) Standard, which will be applied by the CHPQA programme from the 1 January 2014; The Standard sets out definitions, criteria and methodologies for the operation of CHPQA.

CHPQA is a government initiative designed to encourage wider practical application of good quality combined heat and power, community heating and alternative energy fuel technologies.

Issue 5 of the CHPQA specifies different Quality Index formulae for the purposes of determining eligibility for benefits other than ROCs (Renewables Obligation Certificates) – these are more stringent than currently used in Guidance Note 44.

Health and Safety Executive – updated guidance

HSE guidance.combined 1024x816 Industry Update – W/C 10th February 2014The HSE has updated various guidance documents relating to underground services, working at height and the use of ladders:

  • HSG47 ‘Avoiding dangers for underground services‘ – this is the 3rd Edition of this guidance document, aimed at those involved in commissioning, planning, managing and carrying out work on or near underground services.
  • INDG401(rev 2) ‘Working at height‘ – a brief guide aimed at employers (although it will be useful to employees and their representatives) on what they need to do to protect their employees from falls from height (still one of the biggest causes of injury and fatalities in the workplace); and
  • INDG455 ‘Safe use of ladders and stepladders‘ – aimed at employers (although it will be useful to employees and their representatives) on the simple, sensible precautions they should take to keep people safe when using ladders and stepladders. It reiterates that the use of ladders or step ladders for short duration, low-risk work is not banned as some believe

Words by Chris Long